VEGETARIANISM AND THINGS THAT COUNT IN DIET

By JAMES HENRY COOK.

 

THAT vegetarians make mistakes in their diet there is no doubt– they would be the only perfect people in an imperfect world if they did not. I may be tempted some day to write an article of helpful criticism under the title “Dietetic Mistakes made by Vegetarians” but this is not my present purpose.

My wish is rather to write something helpful to that large number of vegetarians who have given up the use of fish, flesh and fowl as food, for health reasons, owing to the fact that they had one foot already in the grave, while doctors and all else had failed them.

I hope also to help further those good folk who are wishful to take the best possible foods to obtain perfect health and fitness. This is not an easy matter, although the writer has spent about forty years at this particular job, and perhaps has made more experiments with food and dictated more letters to both doctors and their patients than any other living man, giving the best possible advice, for which no fee has ever been asked or accepted.

The chief difficulty is the fact that such information to many people sounds too much like a patent medicine advertisement, and any such advice is discounted accordingly. The advice given, however, is often in the direction of what they should leave off rather than what they should take. Adopting a vegetarian diet does not change ones likes and dislikes all at once. The majority are still wishful to eat and drink what they like, and take something to square matters. In other words they want to obtain health and fitness without paying the price.

Perhaps of all people diabetic sufferers are the most hopeless and difficult to deal with in this respect. To go back to the cause of their trouble, and it is useless to attempt to deal with any disease otherwise, this is undoubtedly the partaking of too much sugar and starchy foods in the shape of confectionery and sweet things of all kinds, together with white bread, white rice, white macaroni and sweet dishes largely composed of cornflour.

The patient, having got into the hands of the doctors, writes, “I have been ordered a starchless diet, what can you recommend?” I often think it would be much better for the doctor to tell the patient what he should leave off taking, and also just what foods he should substitute. Two things are quite certain. If the diabetic sufferer starts on the “purely starchless diet” recommended, he is not likely to continue it for long.

If he did “stick it” then the doctor would soon have one less diabetic patient. It pays the doctor much better to start with insulin and thus secure a patient who will never get better, but will continue to be a patient for life.

But what is the Health Food Specialist to say to his would-be customer in reply to the question, “What can you offer in a starchless diet?” He could offer pure protein in the form of gluten, but for what purpose if no digestive organs can digest it, and no diabetic sufferer is likely to try, for long. In its place he should give the patient the best advice possible, tell him the cause of the trouble and how it can be remedied.

Tell him in the place of white bread to substitute pure wholemeal bred, not a brown bread sold under some fancy name, but the genuine article made from the whole of the wheat. In place of white rice substitute natural brown or red undressed rice. Learn to do without added sugar and sweet things containing sugar. Obtain supplies of sugar — that which he feels he must have — from fresh fruits other than bananas, dates, etc.

Such fruits as grapes, limes, lemons (in moderation) oranges and grape fruit or such like juices will do much to purify the blood rather than increase its sugar content, in spite of the contra opinion held and advice given by the majority of doctors. Thus, with a pure blood stream this disease, like all others, ceases to be fed, and cannot long continue to exist.

If the diabetic subject considers something in the form of a diabetic bread is necessary in place of ordinary bread, in spite of the fact that you tell him that expensive diabetic bread and other foods may prove quite unnecessary if the simple advice given is carried out, then the proprietor of the Health Food Store, or the manufacturer, as the case may be, may recommend some particular Diabetic Wholemeal Flour, biscuits, or bread containing a much greater proportion of gluten than is found in ordinary flour and accordingly less starch, and with what result? Ninety and nine diabetics will unwisely continue for years to eat white diabetic bread, while one only will take the wholemeal recommended.

To tell them that pure wholemeal bread at half the price or less is likely to do them more good than diabetic bread, either white or brown, is of no avail. Money spent on research on these lines, in the colleges and hospitals, on the human patients– not on rats, etc.– would do more good than all the money now being spent on insulin and other non-curative and unnatural methods.

The fact that the craving for sugar is very much akin to that for alcohol is very strikingly illustrated by the statistics provided by the U.S.A. during the time prohibition was in force. From the commencement to the end, as the consumption of alcohol per head of the population declined, so the annual consumption per head of sugar increased, and the deaths from diabetes increased in like manner. This does not appear to help the claims advanced for insulin very much.

Much that has been said regarding the dread disease of diabetes applies equally to many other forms of disease, constipation, catarrh and such like stomach troubles. As long as constipation exists no hope can be entertained that any form of disease can be cured. Disease may be suppressed with drugs and one or more worse troubles take its place. In newspaper phraseology, “The improvement in the patients condition unfortunately has not been maintained; double pneumonia (or something else) having developed.” The last state being worse than the first, and the last report is “the invalid dies.”.

I am afraid it would be stating the facts very mildly to say that ninety out of every hundred women suffer with chronic or a milder form of constipation. And why? Two things more than all others doubtless are largely responsible, tea with white bread and butter. The remedy is simple. Substitute dandelion or black fig coffee or cocoa for tea and wholemeal bread, biscuits or rusks for the white bread.

This change alone, if persisted in, would in the majority of cases eventually bring about the desired results. In cases more or less chronic or where speedier results are desired, more drastic remedies should be adopted, with the faith that the right food alone will eventually bring about a cure.

Among the many helpful foods obtainable from Health Food Stores is bran in its many palatable forms, such as the ready-to-eat breakfast foods — Vitanut Bran Flakes or Crumbled Bran, or those requiring cooking as porridge –Romany Rye Meal or Washed Prepared Bran. Other foods of a similar character are Laxative Breakfast Food (Rolled Whole Wheat Kernels) and Macfaddens Strenthro. The four last foods should be eaten with Place-o-bred, Granarg or Wholewheat Crispbread Biscuits to ensure thorough mastication.

To serve with these in place of sugar, Malt Honey or Olivhonie should be substituted, and in very severe cases a sprinkling of Agar Laxative, used as one would pepper and salt. For other meals Nuto Cream Soup eaten with the same of similar crisp biscuits as recommended to be eaten with the porridge. For tea a few Laxative Caramels or soaked Black Spanish figs, prunes or similar fruit eaten with the same class of biscuit or wholemeal bread and butter. Fruit juices, especially pure syrup of black Spanish figs, will work wonders. In long standing and obstinate cases, to hasten matters Psyllium Laxative or Natex Food No. 12a may be taken.

All the things recommended above are foods and cannot do other than remedy any tendency to constipation, and must in a natural manner eventually bring about the results desired, not only in the digestive tract but throughout the whole body.

As an aid to Nature in bringing about this desirable condition, the Health Food Specialist may recommend harmless herb such as “Inner clean”, but this should only be taken to assist Nature to bring about renewed health and fitness, and not for permanent use. Where personal contact is helpful in providing the right atmosphere required for perfect recovery, as is often the case, Homoeopathy is likely to prove of great benefit.

It should always be remembered, however, that while it is one thing, and often a simple matter, to get well, it is quite another matter to keep well. In fact this is an impossibility if one goes back to the old method of living. The old mistakes will reproduce the same troubles. In the September issue I hope to deal with other aspects of ill-health. If any readers would like any particular questions dealt with, I will endeavour to meet their wishes in later issues.

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