DISCUSSION OF CASE I BOENNINGHAUSEN METHOD OF REPERTORIZING

H.A.ROBERTS, M.D.

 

This case seems rather limited in its comprehensiveness, lacking especially symptomatic expression and concomitants; it is therefore difficult to make an intelligent analysis of the case for repertory study.

However, it is apparent that this man is suffering from two of the miasms, psora and syphilis. In psora we get functional disturbances only; this is often at the base of eruptions of the so-called acute diseases, such as the exanthemata, typhoid fever, etc. Psora alone never produces destruction of tissue, rather affecting the functions through the nervous system.

The syphilitic miasm, however, has as its most characteristic manifestation ulceration and destruction of tissues, especially when in combination with psora. This miasm may have been latent until something untraced stirred the psora into action as typhoid fever manifestation. The syphilitic miasm may or may not have been inherited. Therefore, in selecting the remedy to cover the case, we must select s remedy that is both an antipsoric and an antisyphilitic, giving the weight of evidence to that relationship rather than to the relationship with the individual tissues, realizing than the disease condition is deeper than the tissues; it is an affection of the man himself.

In an evaluation of the symptoms we do not consider cheerfulness as a symptoms; it is not a condition that we would wish to eliminated by the administration of a remedy; it is, and should be, the normal state. Suspicion, on the other hand, is an abnormal state (and this gain strengthens our belief in the syphilitic taint, for both syphilis and sycosis have suspicion as outstanding mental traits). Referring to the dictionary, we find suspicion and mistrust as synonymous. If these are synonyms, it is perfectly legitimate to take Boenninghausens rubric Mistrust for our first symptom.

The next rubric is Paralysis, one-sided, for his entire present condition hinges upon this fact. His condition is generally Right-sided, so that would appear as our third rubric. He complains of a Burning pain, externally, so that is our fourth symptom. Lest we be considered as misinterpreting the symptom as given, let us compare this with the rubric, Skin, burning, and we find that the two rubrics run practically the same remedies in close evaluation, varying but one or two points in either direction, but not changing our general evaluation to any degree.

For our fifth symptom, ulcers, it is difficult to decide, because the case as taken gives little description of the ulcer as it occurred; in other words, it is an incomplete symptom, yet characteristic of the case as showing the tendency of the man before the condition was suppressed. Boenninghausen devoted several pages to ulcers, with many descriptive rubrics. The best we can do in this analysis is to select the rubric, ulcers in general, and check is up by adding as a sixth rubric, Bone, necrosis of.

Seventh, we select Altered expression of the face. The question of the slowness of speech is difficult to decide and without more modification should not be considered seriously. Boenninghausen places his speech rubrics under VOICE. We feel that this symptom is without doubt a part of the paralysis, and we assume that, since the voice is produced in the larynx, and lacking other definite the voice is produced in the larynx, and lacking other definite information for the voice rubric, we select Larynx as a location symptoms for our eighth rubric.

The shuffling gait is a part of the paralysis and the rubric Paralysis, already gait is a part of the paralysis, and we assume that, since the voice is produced in the larynx, and lacking other definite information for the voice rubric, we select Larynx as a location symptom for our eighth rubric.

The shuffling gait is a part of the paralysis and the rubric Paralysis, already selected, covers the manifest results.

We fell that there is not reason why this cannot be worked as readily with the Boenninghausen as with any other repertorial system, without invalidating the integrity of the symptoms.

The application of the Boenninghausen method to the few symptoms presented brought the following result:.

Phos. 32/8 Sulph. 29/7 Baryta carb. 25/7.

Bell. 31/8 Acon. 27/7 Lach. 25/7.

Merc. 31/8 Caust. 27/7 Sil. 25/7.

plb. 23/8 Lyc. 27/7 Phos.ac. 24/7.

Ars. 32/7 Rhus tox. 27/7 Calc.carb. 22/7.

Dig. 21/7.

In view of our recognition of the presence of the syphilitic miasm it is interesting to note the relation of Merc. to the case; and the incidence of plumbum after the suppressive measures which were adopted.

After studying the case as presented, and recognizing the miasmatic background, we feel that phosphorus covers the whole condition better than any other remedy, in spite of the fact that phosphorus may not bear the proven relationship to some of the tissues as might be considered desirable on a strictly pathological basis. Phosphorus meets the requirements by being an antipsoric as well as an antisyphilitic, and meets the few symptoms given. Without knowing more of the case in detail, our choice of remedies would be Phosphorus.

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